Massage Therapy

Revive Medical Spa offers a variety of Massage Therapy treatments including Deep Tissue Massage, which focuses on realigning deeper layers of muscles and connective tissue, and Prenatal Massage, which helps relax tense muscles, improves circulation and mobility, and overall, just makes you feel good.

Massage Therapy - Revive Medical Spa

Deep Tissue Massage

What is Deep Tissue Massage?

Deep tissue massage is a type of massage therapy that focuses on realigning deeper layers of muscles and connective tissue. It is especially helpful for chronic aches and pains and contracted areas such as stiff neck and upper back, low back pain, leg muscle tightness, and sore shoulders.

Some of the same strokes are used as classic massage therapy, but the movement is slower and the pressure is deeper and concentrated on areas of tension and pain in order to reach the sub-layer of muscles and the fascia (the connective tissue surrounding muscles).

Deep Tissue Massage

How Does It Work?

When there is chronic muscle tension or injury, there are usually adhesions (bands of painful, rigid tissue) in muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Adhesions can block circulation and cause pain, limited movement, and inflammation.

Muscles must be relaxed in order for the therapist to reach the deeper musculature.

Does Deep Tissue Massage Hurt?

At certain points during the massage, most people find there is usually some discomfort and pain. It is important to communicate to the therapist when things hurt and if any soreness or pain you experience is outside your comfort range.

There is usually some stiffness or pain after a deep tissue massage, but it should subside within a day or so. The massage therapist may recommend applying ice to the area after the massage.

Drinking lots of water after a deep tissue massage will help flush lactic acid out of the tissues and minimize discomfort.

Benefits of Deep Tissue Massage

Deep tissue massage usually focuses on a specific problem, such as chronic muscle pain, injury rehabilitation, and the following conditions:

Chronic pain

Lower back pain

Limited mobility

Recovery from injuries (e.g. whiplash, falls, sports injury)

Repetitive strain injury, such as carpal tunnel syndrome

Postural problems

Muscle tension in the hamstrings, glutes, IT band, legs, quadriceps, rhomboids, upper back

Ostearthritis pain

Sciatica

Piriformis syndrome

Tennis elbow

Fibromyalgia

Muscle tension or spasm

After a workout or bodybuilding

According to Consumer Reports magazine, 34,000 people ranked deep tissue massage more effective in relieving osteoarthritis pain than physical therapy, exercise, prescription medications, chiropractic, acupuncture, diet, glucosamine and over-the-counter drugs.

Deep tissue massage also received a top ranking for fibromyalgia pain. People often notice improved range of motion immediately after a deep tissue massage.

What Can I Expect During My Visit?

Massage therapists may use fingertips, knuckles, hands, elbows, and forearms during the deep tissue massage.

You may be asked to breathe deeply as the massage therapist works on certain tense areas.

How Fast Will I Get Results With A Deep Tissue Massage?

It’s important to be realistic about what one deep tissue massage can achieve. Many people think if the therapist pushes hard enough, they can get rid of all their knots in an hour. This just won’t happen.

In fact, undoing chronic knots and tension built up over a lifetime is best achieved with an integrated program that includes exercise, work on your posture and ways of moving, relaxation techniques and a regular program of massage.

Finally, while deep tissue is certainly valuable, you should be aware that gentle styles of massage like craniosacral therapy can also produce profound release and realignment in the body.

Prenatal Massage

Anyone who’s ever had a professional massage knows that both body and mind feel better afterwards — and the same goes for prenatal massage, which can feel extra wonderful when extra weight and changes in posture stir up new aches and pains. Here’s what you need to know about prenatal massage.

Are massages during pregnancy safe?

Maternal massages are generally considered safe after the first trimester, as long as get the green light from you practitioner and you let your massage therapist know you’re pregnant. But you’ll want to avoid massage during the first three months of pregnancy as it may trigger dizziness and add to morning sickness.

Despite myths you might have heard, there’s is no magic eject button that will accidentally disrupt your pregnancy, and there isn’t much solid scientific proof that specific types of massage can have an effect one way or the other. Some massage therapists avoid certain pressure points, including the one between the anklebone and heel, because of concern that it may trigger contractions, but the evidence on whether massage actually can kickstart labor is inconclusive (to nonexistent). It is a good idea to avoid having your tummy massaged, since pressure on that area when you’re pregnant can make you uncomfortable.

If you are in the second half of your pregnancy (after the fourth month), don’t lie on your back during your massage; the weight of your baby and uterus can compress blood vessels and reduce circulation to your placenta, creating more problems than any massage can cure.

Another thing to keep in mind: While any massage therapist can, theoretically, work on pregnant women, it’s best to go to a specialist who has a minimum of 16 hours of advanced training in maternal massage. (There’s no specific certification, so you should ask when you make your appointment.) This way, you can rest assured you’re in the hands of someone who knows exactly how to relieve any pain and pressure related to your changing anatomy.

Finally, always check with your practitioner before receiving a prenatal massage — particularly if you have diabetes, morning sickness, preeclampsia, high blood pressure, fever, a contagious virus, abdominal pain or bleeding — they’re complications that could make massage during pregnancy risky.

Photofacial Treatment Video

Benefits of prenatal massage:

Research shows that massage can reduce stress hormones in your body and relax and loosen your muscles. It can also increase blood flow, which is so important when you’re pregnant, and keep your lymphatic system working at peak efficiency, flushing out toxins from your body. And it reconnects your mind with your body, a connection that’s comforting if you sometimes wonder if there’s a baby in there or if an alien has taken up residence inside of you.

During pregnancy, regular prenatal massages may not only help you relax, but may also relieve insomnia, joint pain, neck and back pain, leg cramping and sciatica. Additionally, it can reduce swelling in your hands and feet (as long as that swelling isn’t a result of preeclampsia), relieve carpal tunnel pain, and alleviate headaches and sinus congestion — all common pregnancy problems. Massage may also lift depression without the use of medication, according to some scientific studies.

How prenatal massage differs from regular massage:

Prenatal massages are adapted for the anatomical changes you go through during pregnancy. In a traditional massage, you might spend half the time lying face-down on your stomach (which is uncomfortable with a baby belly) and half the time facing up (a position that puts pressure on a major blood vessel that can disrupt blood flow to your baby and leave you feeling nauseous).

But as your shape and posture changes, a trained massage therapist will make accommodations with special cushioning systems or holes that allow you to lie face down safely, while providing room for your growing belly and breasts. Or you might lie on your side with the support of pillows and cushions.

And don’t expect deep tissue work on your legs during a prenatal massage. While gentle pressure is safe (and can feel heavenly!), pregnant women are particularly susceptible to blood clots, which deep massage work can dislodge. That, in turn, can be risky. On other body parts, the pressure can be firm and as deep or as gentle as you’d like. Always communicate with your therapist about what feels good — and if something starts to hurt.

How much do prenatal massages cost?

Most insurance plans don’t cover prenatal massage, but some offer discounts — a good thing considering the cost of a prenatal massage session can cost between $60 and $100 or more for a 30- to 60-minute massage, depending on your location and the facility.

How to give a prenatal massage at home:

Ask your partner to use these tips for an at-home maternal massage:

Gentle foot rub: Using lotion for smoother strokes, your partner can start by rubbing the top of the foot with gentle pressure, working from the toes towards the ankle and making small circles around the ankle. Then, have him use both thumbs to make small circles on the sole of the foot right beneath the toes. On the heel, he can move one thumb down as the other thumb moves up, and continue to alternate. He can also gently tug on each toe and use the index finger or thumb to rub between them. It’s probably a good idea to avoid the pressure point between the anklebone and heel just in case.

Back rub: Sitting up or lying on your side, have your partner use both hands to stroke up and down the back, using lotion to help his hands glide. He should focus on the muscles on either side of the spine and can transition to kneading the muscles with his thumbs or base of the hand, moving up and down.

Shoulder rub: With the base of the hand or the pads of the fingertips, apply gentle pressure on one side of the neck and glide between the top of the shoulder and base of the skull. Repeat on the opposite side.

Scalp massage: Moving from the base of the skull to the hairline, use both hands and spread fingers to apply gentle pressure to the scalp, circling hands together or apart. Add gentle stroking of the face, which can be amazingly relaxing.
Belly. Don’t massage it! Instead, gently rub it with Vitamin E oil for a soothing effect that can also help prevent stretch marks.

And when your partner’s not around? Try prenatal yoga on your own: The stretching and breathing can help you de-stress and unwind in a pinch!

Schedule Your Private Consultation Today!

781-364-6464

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Revive Medical Spa

800 West Cummings Park Suite 2050

Woburn, MA 01801

781-364-6464

Spa Hours

Monday - Friday: 10AM - 5PM

Saturday: 10AM - 6PM

Sunday: BY APPOINTMENT

Revive Medical Spa

Revive Medical Spa